Blog

Rio 20-infinity

Michael Phelps is the most decorated Olympian of all time. He puts countless hours into intense training no matter the year, and yet his recognition only comes every 4.

Swimming is not the sport where you have favorite players or teams. In fact, you don’t even say I play swimming, as you would most other sports. There’s no sub for when you get tired, fouls, or even contact at all for that matter.

In a survey conducted by Statistica.com, Swimming was the favorite sport to watch during the Olympic season at 21%. The closest was Gymnastics at 15%.

Why, you may ask, is it only every four years Swimming becomes the favorite sport to watch during the Olympics? Because there are no competitive teams. Imagine a swim team per major city similarly to the MLB, NBA, and NHL.

Attendance would not be an issue after the obvious interest shown during the olympic years. With the popularity that has surrounded the new addition of a soccer team within the city of Cincinnati (FC Cincinnati), it brings into question the possibility of a competitive swim team in the area. Swim teams similar to this exist in North Carolina (SwimMac) and in Maryland (NBAC). These elite programs produce olympians. A team around Cincinnati would bring more attention to Ohio Swimming and give midwest swimmers the opportunity to compete at an elite level year-round.

An Open Letter to my Transgender Friend

She and I shared laughs. We shared hugs. We shared faith. Now all he and I share is a Facebook-friendship. She and I went to the same church. I always thought she was slightly quirky but in the best way. She was the kind of person you could count on to be there every Sunday. The one you’d vent to and she’d somehow sympathize with despite not completely understanding your meaning. She was a friend that I lost.

He’s new. He remembers his old life but chooses to forget it. I’m stuck in his old life. He identifies me with the hurt and pain he felt trapped in the body of a girl. He sees me high-fiving her unfitting hands.

I recall admiring her new hair. A short pixie cut was how my mom and I saw it. He saw it as a step closer to being who he was.

Everyone talks about the struggle one goes through when they transition from man to woman or woman to man. Without a doubt the challenges and difficulties they face are unimaginable, but what about their friends? What about the people who knew them but now don’t? The ones that cherished the friendship, and now aren’t even acknowledged in the hallways?

I will never understand her, now him. It saddens me that I am associated with the hurt she once felt. Tell me friend, how must I transition too?